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Mon, 04 Mar 2024

American Short Fiction Sells Digital Subscriptions to Libraries via Exact Editions

London, 4th March 2024

American Short Fiction Sells Digital Subscriptions to Libraries via Exact Editions

Literature departments around the world can now subscribe to the complete digital archive and ongoing issues of American Short Fiction through the Exact Editions platform. The archive, which dates back to 1991, is accessible across web, iOS and Android devices.

American Short Fiction’s mission is to be a diverse, inclusive, and discerning publisher of today’s best literary short fiction. Founded in 1991 at the University of Texas at Austin in cooperation with the Texas Center for Writers and NPR’s “The Sound of Writing” broadcast, the magazine quickly gained a national reputation for exemplary fiction. Novelist Lauren Groff said: “The common element of all American Short Fiction's published stories is, simply, excellence.”

The archive hosted on the Exact Editions platform comprises not only interactive linked contents pages, but also a powerful search function that allows references to key words and topics to be found in individual issues or across the full archive at the click of a button. Institutional subscriptions offer unlimited IP-authenticated access for libraries as well as usage reports for librarians and MARC records.

Digital subscriptions to American Short Fiction are available in the Exact Editions’ shops here:

Institutional Subscriptions

Associate Publisher Amanda Faraone remarked: “The back issues have translated wonderfully to this new digital format and we’re delighted with how interactive the archive is. Exact Editions’ connections with libraries will allow us to reach new audiences and expand our reach worldwide.”

Managing Director of Exact Editions, Daryl Rayner, said: “American Short Fiction is a wonderful addition to the robust selection of literature titles we offer to libraries. The title’s award-winning work and compelling design will make it a popular resource with students and academics alike.”


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