Skip to main content
Read page text

unnerved his attackers. ‘I don’t know what the guy is on,’ one said to the other, ‘but he’s sure higher than high on something.’ And off they went. Life and Loves. Having assisted in the rescue of a man off Noah’s Long Island home, Jason and his brother have a feeling of renewed and justified conceit. Jason and Susie and their children are visiting the older Noah and Miriam. The saved man comes to the house with the brothers. When his alarmed mistress arrives, she is indignant at finding him in relaxed good spirits. She has been so worried that the pair come to blows. We cut to Jason and Susie driving back to the big city, seemingly reconciled by their amusement. Then, in Voice Over, as the car moves away from us, onto the bridge into Manhattan, we mix to the quarrel which will precede her leaving him. J.P.S. refers, with regret, to our old tutor Renford Bambrough having become ‘right-wing’. John remains cautiously loyal, the caution partly sentimental, partly politic. Renford will always be the man who taught him Greek prose composition. Judy holds that R. is a ‘closet roué’. If so, it is probably in a closet for one. Life and Loves. Jason is revealed not to be the son of the father whom he goes to see in the Retirement Compound; that he is no more than Noah’s half-brother is both relief and divorce. His mother Gertrude’s insistence on living her own life comes home to him in his alarm at Susie’s appetite for independence. This declares itself in an attack on his mother’s ‘extortionate’ black lover. When he tells Gertrude that she shares the latter’s favours with someone else, she says ‘We all share people with other people, don’t we?’ Knowledge of his true paternity prompts Jason’s affectionate return to the bedside of his dying nominal father. Sympathy is readier when it can be a performance. John says that he first went to the US because it was the quickest way to secure a divorce from Mary. He still sees his pretty, dark-haired second wife (‘Judy Sullivan’). Married to a realtor, she lives in Buffalo. While bruised by her defection, he makes light of it, as he does of most things; and wishes that others would. He has since been in a lot of beds. He insists that Irish blood explains his capacity to absorb alcohol without impairing his wits; but a weary undertone, when he boasts of his workload, suggests that his brain is paying pickled taxes. 12.8.81. Patrick, Jilly and Emma Sergeant have just left. The contrast with our other summer visitors, Tony Smith and Shirley Williams, lends

4

My Bookmarks


    Skip to main content